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Where your PhD writing skills are in high demand

Can mastering writing skills “future proof” your career?  This was the topic of a recent article but the demand for superior writing skills, when combined with deep domain knowledge in a particular field, opens up even more career opportunities for the PhD and post-graduate community.

Editors are now working in a variety of locations (beyond major media centers).  Over 7 per cent are employed in professional, scientific, technical services (an area with significant PhD-level demand) and over 20 per cent are self-employed or freelance, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

We found that many professional and scientific writing and editing jobs are “PhD preferred,” requiring not only superior editing and writing skills but also the ability to analyze and identify trends in a chosen field, produce scientific and other research grants, advance public policies, and edit and manage content within professional journals.  Careers in the editing field cut across government, professional journals, NGOs and commercial entities.

This week we have gathered a cluster of opportunities that include freelance and full-time positions.  There are many more to discover (or create), and we will focus separately on editing and content creation within the education field (think Wiley, Khan Academy, education technology) in a future post.

HSS

Editor, Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press

Freelance Editors, Vera Institute of Justice

Editor in Chief, Data Science Journal

Senior Editor, Nature Research

Freelance Editors, Crimson Interactive

STEM

Editor, Trends in Biochemical Sciences, Elsevier

Medical Editor, Dermatology

Senior Scientific Grant Writer, NY Genome Center

Senior Medical Writer, Critical Thinking

Senior Technical Editor, SAIC (Defense Threats)

For access to more jobs as well as archived and searchable opportunities, visit our SmartJobs page. Note: SmartJobs access requires a university affiliation. User-generated jobs are open to all members and can be accessed here.

PhD Careers in Counseling, Wellness and Communities

Helping the human condition has always been a growing field. In the US, projected job growth for “social workers” is 16.1% over ten years – more than double the 7.4% national average. Of course, the definition of social work is much broader than the occupational title suggests, and includes a widening range of counseling, data analysis, psychoanalysis, and community impact — all in need of PhD skills.

Our sampling of jobs this week includes working on mental health issues with veterans or trauma recovery in specific communities, measuring the social impact and sustainability of Medicaid, using data analysis to improve social impact initiatives, and a range of psychological, health and wellness counseling on college campuses and in cities across the country.

HSS

Clinical Coordinator, Partnerships for Trauma Recovery

Social Worker, Homelessness, Veterans Administration (Various)

Director of Counseling, Occidental College

Clinical Psychologist, Central Intelligence Agency

Data Analytics Specialist, Family & Children Services of Silicon Valley

STEM

Policy and Research Fellow, Institute for Medicaid Innovation

Behavioral Health Specialist, U of Chicago

Neuropsychologist – Concussion Program, Nicklaus Children’s Hospital

Clinical Psychologist, Autism Center, Child Mind Institute

Senior Research Scientist, New Jewish Home

For access to more jobs as well as archived and searchable opportunities, visit our SmartJobs page. Note: SmartJobs access requires a university affiliation. User-generated jobs are open to all members and can be accessed here.

 

The Future of Food – and Where the Jobs Are

In 2015, a joint USDA and Purdue University report analyzed a set of robust employment opportunities trends in food, agriculture, renewable resources and the environment between 2015-2020.  They found a broad range of jobs in business, government, education, food and materials production, and food science and engineering, many of which were not being filled.  Today, the so-called FoodTech sector has also expanded dramatically, employing highly skilled PhDs and those with advanced degrees and entrepreneurial skills, including jobs in food security, safety, sustainability and delivery.

From this deep pool of potential jobs and career ideas, we unearthed a veritable feast of opportunities in the food and agriculture sector.  What we found was everything from plant science to using machine learning to enhance food security, sustainability and wellness programs for families in the US and around the world, research into food allergies and microbes, policy positions directing food initiatives at leading foundations, data analysis for restaurants, positions managing coffee farming and Coca-Cola around the world, and re-engineering how and what we eat.

HSS

Director, Food Initiative, Rockefeller Foundation

Zero Hunger on Campus, Campaign Director

CEO, Eat REAL

Development Director, International Rescue Fund

Coffee Program Director, TechnoServe

STEM

Scientist, Product Development, The Coca-Cola Company

Researcher, Machine Learning for Agriculture and Food Security

Safe Food Project, Senior Associate, Pew Charitable Trust

Senior Plant Scientist, Aero Farms

Dietician, US Department of Veterans Affairs

For access to more jobs as well as archived and searchable opportunities, visit our SmartJobs page. Note: SmartJobs access requires a university affiliation. User-generated jobs are open to all members and can be accessed here.

Beyond Banking: PhD Diversity within the Financial Sector

Source:  TechFunnel

Today’s financial sector is highly diverse in terms of job requirements, the size and type of enterprises, geographic concentration as well as levels of technological innovation, salary and social mission.  From cryptocurrency start-ups to education finance to social impact investing and international banking and consulting, the finance sector also a significant source for hiring PhDs.

In the US alone, by 2026 the finance and insurance industry is projected to employ over 6 million workers, but less than half (2.4 million workers) will be at firms employing 10,000 people or more (see Figure 1). This suggests a wide range of future opportunities that span far beyond the typical banking job, and include not-for-profit and earlier stage ventures.

Figure 1: Diversity of Employment by Size of Firm

Below is a small cluster of representative jobs drawn from our weekly analysis, including many jobs that are not typically associated with the finance sector.

HSS

Advisor, Art for Justice Fund, Rockefeller Foundation

Strategy and Planning Head, Global Scaled Solutions, Uber

Global Controller, Human Rights Watch

Deputy Director, Field Services, Population Services International

Chief Economist, Global Natural Resources

STEM

Senior Financial Engineer, Calypso

Vice President, Senior Model Validator, BNP Paribas

Principal Quantitative Analyst, Finra

Director, Merchant Rick Oversight, PayPal

Officer, Conservation Science (Economics), Pew Charitable Trust

For access to more jobs as well as archived and searchable opportunities, visit our SmartJobs page. Note: SmartJobs access requires a university affiliation. User-generated jobs are open to all members and can be accessed here.

After the Shutdown: Government Demand for PhDs

Not happy with certain aspects of the US or state government?  Why not work to change it. The US government is a consistent and significant employer of PhDs across numerous academic disciplines–and it won’t always be shut down.

In 2016, there were 19.4 million employed in local and state government positions, a figure that is projected to reach 20.1 million by 2026 according to BLS data. A quick glance at USAJOBs, the official website for government positions, identifies the most urgent hiring needs in the following areas:

Of course, open positions don’t necessarily require a PhD but there are many which do. Our search of “PhD appropriate” government jobs has also yielded a number of positions across a range of disciplines, including firms which sub-contract for government services and are involved in policy advocacy or government relations.  Take a look.

HSS

Director of Federal Affairs, Americans for the Arts

Proposal Development Specialist (DfID Global Fund)

Executive Vice President, Study Abroad, CIEE

Policy/Program Specialist, Nat’l Conference of State Legislatures

Psychometrician, Clinical Quality Measures

STEM

Strategic Intelligence Analyst, National Defense

Computer Vision Product Architect, In-Q-Tel

Environmental Engineer, US Department of the Army

Astrophysicist, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Civil Engineer, Department of Transportation

For access to more jobs as well as archived and searchable opportunities, visit our SmartJobs page. Note: SmartJobs access requires a university affiliation. User-generated jobs are free to all members and can be accessed here.

 

Is your PhD ready for a start-up?

 

Start-ups and early stage ventures continue to be significant drivers of new employment in the US but often fall below the radar for graduates students and university career centers.  This is a gap that needs to be filled.

In 2018, nearly $100 billion was invested in early stage companies.  Since many such ventures and non-profit enterprises are focused on the cutting edge of innovation and social impact, they are naturally drawn to college graduates (over a third of start-up employees) and to those holding advanced degrees and PhDs.

If you haven’t broadened your career search in this area, now may be the time to do so. According to the chart below, start-up activity, based on a broad group of measures comprising the Start-Up Activity Index, is on the upswing from a period of relative calm.

Source: Kauffman Foundation Start-Up Activity Index

Moreover the Kauffman Foundation, a leading researcher on start-up activity and employment, notes several trends in start-up activity according to a 2017 report (the latest available):

1. There are 540,000 new business owners created each month.

2. 86.3% of this entrepreneurial activity arises from “necessity” rather than opportunity.  Immigrants account for 29.5% of new entrepreneurs.  39.5% of new entrepreneurs are female.

3. College graduates increased from 23.7% of entrepreneurs in 1996 to 30.1% in 2016. Older adults are a growing segment of new enterprise creation (26%% between ages of 45-54).

  • For more detailed trends nationally, you can refer the Foundation’s report here.

Here are a few opportunities to consider.

HSS

Global Manager, Brewing Capabilities (Food Science), ZX Ventures

Director of Product, Words with Friends (Zynga)

Director of Partnerships, Upstream

Senior Data Scientist, Juul

Lead Product Manager – Healthcare BCG Digital

STEM

Program Director, Healthcare Accelerator (Cedars Sinai)

Head of R&D (Machine Learning), Findmine

Director, Business Development, DayTwo

Sr. Data Analyst, Revenue Analytics, RentPath

Business Development Scientist – Immunology

For access to more jobs as well as archived and searchable opportunities, visit our SmartJobs page. Note: SmartJobs access requires a university affiliation. User-generated jobs are open to all members and can be accessed here.

 

An Aging Population Underpins Healthcare Employment

 

By the year 2035, older people in the US ( > 65 years) will outnumber younger people (< 18) for the first time. Net international migration is projected to be the main driver of US  population growth, while one in five people will be at retirement age. As the population ages, demand for health and wellness products, medical care and longer lives will undoubtedly increase. The starkness of this population-age change between 1960 and 2060 is illustrated by US Census Bureau projections on the left.

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are practical implications for the job market: employment in healthcare and social assistance is forecast to add roughly 4 million jobs between 2016 and 2026, amounting to one-third of all new jobs in the US. And that may only be the beginning of the growth curve.
  • How will technology application, new innovations and the need to communicate with patients create new jobs in the future?  How can well-honed research skills be applied to this diverse healthcare sector? What future jobs in healthcare have yet to be created?

We provide a few examples here, but even cursory research into healthcare suggests a wide range of opportunities for PhDs exist across many disciplines.

HSS

Medicaid Researcher

Executive Director, New York HHS (Children’s Cabinet Job)

Senior Associate, Human Stewardship, Antibiotic Resistance

Real World Evidence Data Scientist, Astra Zeneca

Healthcare Communications, Practice Leader

STEM

Senior Data Scientist, Strava

Director, Patient Advocacy

Senior Analyst, Population Health Analytics

Senior Intellectual Property Manager, Pharma

Medical Director, Hematology

For access to more jobs as well as archived and searchable opportunities, visit our SmartJobs page. Note: SmartJobs access requires a university affiliation. User-generated jobs are open to all members and can be accessed here.